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Author Topic: Faculty Guitar Recital 11/24  (Read 39320 times)
Matthew4161
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« Reply #30 on: December 01, 2009, 12:49:11 pm »

I was just reading a concert critique written by someone in a different class than ours to see if their requirments were the same or if ours views would be the same. At first it seemed like we had similar thoughts on what the concert was going to be like, "boring" but then all of a sudden it changed to how great of a performance it was. I think it is funny how people can see the same show and have such different responses to it.
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Matthew4161
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« Reply #31 on: December 01, 2009, 12:54:50 pm »

i just read another one of those very entertaining concert critiques posting by one of these outstanding students here at Miami Dade and have to say i wonder what substance they were on that altered their perspective to the point that they can say they actually enjoyed one of these faculty concerts. 
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Matthew4161
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« Reply #32 on: December 01, 2009, 01:01:34 pm »

So i am not exactly sure if when doing these posts if i have to use musical terms and things of that nature so i want to ask do you think music is a universal langauge? That it can connect with people in all cultures regardless of if you speak english, chinese or some african dialect somewhere out in the jungle.
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Matthew4161
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« Reply #33 on: December 01, 2009, 01:26:35 pm »

Ever since a child i felt like music was a part of my life do you think that if you play a certain kind of music in a room filled of pregnant women that those children will come out with more of a musical/artistic ability? and if you were to change the type of music playing would it change the effects those children would feel?
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Matthew4161
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« Reply #34 on: December 01, 2009, 01:33:20 pm »

hasnt there been studies done that if a child grows up taking music classes ever since he or she was old enough to go to school that they tend to have a higer grade point average? so is it than safe to say that music can make a person more intelligent?
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Matthew4161
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« Reply #35 on: December 01, 2009, 01:46:46 pm »

Music is such an important past of our culture and cultures around the world. where do you think music was the most influential or the place and time where music change the most?
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Matthew4161
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« Reply #36 on: December 01, 2009, 02:04:47 pm »

who was the first person to ever start writting down notes to represent a certain sound? when and where was this happening and how did it come to be a universal code that everyone around the world uses and recognizes?
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Juliana9107
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« Reply #37 on: December 01, 2009, 04:34:09 pm »

I attended the Faculty Guitar Concert on Tuesday, November 24, 2009. It was held at 7:30 pm in the McCarthy Auditorium.  The auditorium was completely full with some odd number of audience members reaching past 330. Performers that night, included Mitch Farber, Tom Lippincott, Carlos Molina, Sandy Poltarack, and  Juan Carlos Vera. Those who performed specifically on bass guitar include Matt Bonelli, Jonathan Dadurka, and Rafael Valencia. There was also a surprising appearance by Jack Ciano who performed on the drums. The first guitarist of the night was Juan Carlos Vera. He performed a Cuban inspired song dating back to the 1940s. This was an excellent piece as the first song of the concert because it gave a history to the “guitar”. Sometimes people have a general idea of how guitar is used or played. This song expanded on that idea. The second performer of the night was Carlos Molina with his Venezuelan waltz. This song was romantic and gave off a very warm feel. The strumming and technique used during the song was incredible. During this part of the concert, much amazement could be felt throughout the auditorium. “Lullaby of Birdland” was the third performance by Natt Bonelli, Rafael Valencia, and Jon Dadurka. This men had great energy on stage. It was noted at the beginning of the song that in fact all three had attended school together. In my opinion, this song has a smooth beginning but a boring and overplayed middle as well as ending. At this point of the concert things turned uninteresting. The following two songs were Fools rush in and Juicy Lucy; Both seeming to be never ending. The energy once created on stage by the performers, slowly died down. Tom Lippincott saved the stage by performing They Can’t take that away from me by George and Ira Gershwin. Tom briefly explain the song and continued to say that the version he would perform was a version by Ted Greene. Tom actually learned this version by listening to his personal guitar hero, Ted Greene.
“Luteous Pangolin” was performed by Lippincott, Bonelli, and Ciano. The intro was played on electric guitar in a high register. Cymbals on the drums played in the background and had climaxed dynamics. The next and last two songs featured a very talented guitarist Mitch Farber. They also happened to be in the style of groove music. Unfortunately, many audience  members left before these two songs could be played. But once the performers got into “ the groove” the auditorium came to life again. These two songs emphasized all the different types of guitars as well as the drums. The beat was consistent and upbeat, and the dynamics added a nice touch. The guitars had a wide range of notes, with strings being plucked at all lengths of the instrument itself. I was surprised and asked myself, “ If they can do THIS, why wouldn’t they play based on this ‘groove’?” The last part of the concert was definitely more entertaining and served the audience more appropriately.
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Magdaly2685
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« Reply #38 on: December 01, 2009, 05:24:07 pm »

On November 24th I attended the Faculty Guitar Recital. I was a bit worried that it wasn't going to be a concert that I would enjoy, but fortunately I was proved wrong. The first performer was Juan Carlos Vera who played some songs that were of Cuban origin from the 1940's. The song had a very lively, upbeat tempo. I felt as if I was at a Cuban restaurant. After that he played the Venezuelen Waltz which was very fast, with quick tempo. Most of these songs were very energetic and kept me up, but what was funny was that the following performance "Lullaby of Birdland" made me fall asleep. So I went from up and aware, to practically taking a nap. The lullaby wasn't an awful song at all it was just a really slow tempo, as if they were trying to make us fall asleep. It was peformed well just not enough to keep me interested. Following that came "Juicy Lucy" which was a good rhythm and beat but wasn't one of my favorites. It was an alright song, well played. I guess since the show started in a lively matter I expected it to stay that way the whole time. Towards the end though it did get a lot better. They played " Cold Duck Time" which had me out of my seat bobbing my head. And they also played "Tune 88" which was pretty good as well. Both songs were very upbeat, fast, and lively. It seemed that it woke the crowd up from the previous performances. I thought it was neat that they incorporated drums, bass, and the cello into this recital. It added a lot to it even though it was supposed to be a Guitar concert it was all greatly done. Different types of music were shown and in a way showed us how different places vary in their music and customs. Overall, I would give this concert a two-thumbs up!
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andre7310
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« Reply #39 on: December 03, 2009, 08:03:28 am »

Coming from a latino background. I was glad to see Juan Carlos Vera open the performance with a popular cuban song from the 1940s.  The song was a little slow, but he was still able to deliver, and grasp the attention from the entire audience.  He wasn't the next Carlos Santana, but he for sure killed it.  The first sound quality from his guitar was amazing.  Then to watch Carlos Molina, a venezuelen, play a beautiful piece was just outstanding.
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susana7954
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« Reply #40 on: December 03, 2009, 08:31:12 am »

on November 24th I attended the faculty guitar recital. for my bad luck i had to leave at the middle of the performance. i have to say that for the time i stayed it was just wonderful. i have to say that the teachers really know their stuff.
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Maria8244
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« Reply #41 on: December 03, 2009, 09:39:34 am »

I attended the Faculty guitar recital on Tuesday, november 24, 2009. I actually enjoyed more this recital than the other I attended which was the “broadway recital” and it was full of people that I did not really expect. Juan Carlos Vera had the opening act. He performed “ojos bravos” which is from cuba in the 1940’s. what I enjoyed watching about juan carlos was the way he we plucking the strings on the guitar. The melodies and the tempo was slow. The songs he played were not that long but it had a good sound to the theme he was pulling off. The second performer was carlos molina. He is a venezuelan. He was giving a little bit of background of himself, telling us how back in venezuela he would play the guitar with another incredible guitarist. In his performance he played two songs which were a little more high in tempo compared to the first performance. The two songs he performed were venazuelan songs. One was a beauiful waltz. I enjoy listening to waltz and dancing to it. And the other song was a spanish song which like I said it picked up more on the tempo. One thing about him is that he would miss some notes. I could understand if he did, usually performers get nervous on stage. I should know because I have been performing all my life and there has been times where I just forgot my part and just improvise. And let me tell you something, just by being on stage, you have a lot of guts, being in front of a lot of people just staring at you brings nervousness. One song that I found nice but exhausting was “lullaby of birdland” it had such a soft tempo and melody it just wants to put you to sleep. And I am a person who enjoys listening to the rainforest and the birds chirping and the water flowing down the river. That definitly puts me to sleep. Over all of the experience that I attended, it was fun. I saw how the guys were nervous but at the same time they were there to put on one hell of a performance and also for them to have a great time. These little recitals is always a practice for them in case if they do decide to perform it live in a court yard or concert.
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michael4206
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« Reply #42 on: December 04, 2009, 08:06:30 am »

Mul 1010
Rodriguez. Mike

Last night I attended the Faculty Guitar Recital at Miami Dade College. I attended the woodwind Quintet and I thought the guitar recital would be the same as that. As I looked around I noticed that almost all the people there where only there to meet a course requirement. At first that was my motive also, but as the night went on I did not see it as an assignment, I thought of it more as a concert. At first I was a little bored, but at the end I really enjoyed it. Well as the night started off I noticed that I was completely wrong. I did not think that the faculty has such talent, but I was once again proven wrong. The first performer J.C. Vera seemed a little nervous at the start, but he seemed to relax once he began to play the pieces. The piece was played slowly, but I still fund it to have an incredible meaning behind it. Carlos, the second performer had a complete different case. He played a piece that was fast and impressive. I liked the first two performers more because they were playing Hispanic music and I am Hispanic. The next piece was a slow, relaxing song played by three people. At the end of the night there was so many thoughts going throgh my mind that I was just in shock of how well they facaulty was able to perform. i enjoyed the performance and if I had the chance to see the same performance again. I would not give it a second thought. I would be there in a minute
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Stephanie8569
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« Reply #43 on: December 04, 2009, 09:47:29 am »

On November 24, 2009 I attended the Faculty Guitar Recital Concert. This concert was packed up and barely had any room for people. And by far one of my favorite concerts I have ever attended.

The first act was by Juan Carlos Vera. This act was not in the program guide but was very well played. This song had no title but he informed us that the song was an old Cuban song from the 40’s. this song had a mixture of emotions. Its was soft and soothing at first but then it got fast like a regular Hispanic song then settled to a fast and slow tempo towards the end.

The second act was Waltz 2nd Española #5. This song was made by a Venezuelan composer. This song started off at a normal speed that lightened the mood. Then later on slow down then started to speed up. This added a little flair to the song.  This song caught me due to the changing tempos and how they got it to fuse together. Personally I don’t like the waltz much but this act got me interested.

The third act was “Lullaby of Birdland”. This one was by George Shearing. This act had an uplifting mood. I personally loved the guitar solo. The believe guitar is a very strong instrument.

The fourth act was “Fools Rush In” and was by Johnny Mercer and Rube Bloom. This song had a romantic tone to it. This one by far was my favorite. Sandy Poltarack had an awesome solo. He made the act very awesome and amazing. And he’s an awesome guitar player. And the last lyrics “When I met you life began, so let this fool in” just connected everything together.

The fifth act was “Juicy Lucy” by Horace Silver. This act had a fast tempo and had a great melody. This song was a sudden burst due to the wonderful sounds of the cello with the guitar. But then it slowed down to a nice and soft beat.

The sixth act was “They Can’t Take That Away From Me”. This act was by George and Ira Gershwin. This act started slow. Completely different than the last act. And in this act the pitches would change from high to low and low to high.

The seventh act was “Luteous Pangolin”. This act was by Ben Monder. In this act the guitars started at a slow speed. And in the end the other instruments joined in for a beautiful and slow performance.

The eighth act was “Cold Duck Time” by Eddie Harris. This song had a Jazz feel to it. Personally I didn’t like this one as much as the other acts.

And the final act was “Tune 88” by Jeff Lorber. This act had an amazing drum solo. This is my second favorite act throughout the whole concert.

Awesome job!
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farroll1565
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« Reply #44 on: December 04, 2009, 11:00:36 am »

farroll scott
Mul 1010
Who new teachers could rock like that, and for them to actually be on beat and key. Juancarlos Vera opened the faculty guitar concert with what I would call a Cuban ballad.  He mentioned the song was orginally from the 40's. The song began slow and then began to pic the tempo speed up and more chords were introduced.  juancarlos finished the song,with finesse,speeding up the temp changing pitches and the bringing it home... next up was Mr.Carlos Molina,Waltz 2nd espanola number 5 another axe man. While Carlos missed a couple of notes I can see why with the Venezuelan waltz being uptempo and rhythmic, he did a awesome job though and ended it on a good note, but still lacked in comparison to Carlos if you ask me.  
George sheoring was up to bat next with his lullaby of birdland, two based guitarist accompanied. I was not crazy about this performance,but none the less it was a good performance. Sandy potorack performed with John dadurkan with another bass and guitar connection. My favorite piece of the night though was they cant take that away from me, by gearoge and ira gershwih the melodic feel and time stopping beat mace me freeze in my seat. Fool's rush in was relatable But was not that exciting to me I wasn't. Crazy about cold duck time either. But over all I enjoyed seeing the teacher rock on and would and will return  
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